Home » Arabic Letters: Waw-Vav, Shin, Hamza, Ayin, Yodh, Kaph, Gimel, Arabic Letter Keyboard Intellark, Taw, He, Qoph, Bet, Tsade, Dalet, Het by Source Wikipedia
Arabic Letters: Waw-Vav, Shin, Hamza, Ayin, Yodh, Kaph, Gimel, Arabic Letter Keyboard Intellark, Taw, He, Qoph, Bet, Tsade, Dalet, Het Source Wikipedia

Arabic Letters: Waw-Vav, Shin, Hamza, Ayin, Yodh, Kaph, Gimel, Arabic Letter Keyboard Intellark, Taw, He, Qoph, Bet, Tsade, Dalet, Het

Source Wikipedia

Published August 12th 2011
ISBN : 9781233051724
Paperback
28 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Waw/Vav, Shin, Hamza, Ayin, Yodh, Kaph, Gimel, Arabic Letter Keyboard Intellark, Taw, He, Qoph, Bet,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Waw/Vav, Shin, Hamza, Ayin, Yodh, Kaph, Gimel, Arabic Letter Keyboard Intellark, Taw, He, Qoph, Bet, Tsade, Dalet, Heth, Pe, Mem, Nun, Arabic Letter Frequency, Resh, Zayin, Ghain, Teth, Lamedh, T marb a, Gaf, d,,, Che, Ve,, l, Ng, B, ?h?, Kh?, ?e, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?. Excerpt: Waw (, sometimes also spelled vau, or vav) is the sixth letter of the Northwest Semitic family of scripts, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, and Arabic (sixth in abjadi order- it is 27th in modern Arabic order). In most Semitic languages it represents the sound, and in some (such as Hebrew and Arabic) also the long vowel, depending on context. In Modern Hebrew, the consonantal pronunciation is or, a pattern shared by certain non-Semitic languages using the Arabic alphabet such as Persian and Urdu. The Phoenician letter gave rise to the Greek digamma (, whose name in Greek was probably ) and upsilon (), and Etruscan V (, . Vav literally means hook/peg/spear. Hebrew spelling: Waw has three orthographic variants, each with a different phonemic value and phonetic realisation: in modern hebrew the frequency of the usage of vav, out of all the letters, is about 10.00%. Consonantal vav (?) generally represents a voiced labiodental fricative (like the English v) in Ashkenazi, European Sephardi, and modern Israeli Hebrew- and originally a labial-velar approximant (). It is still pronounced as a w by some Jews of Oriental (Arabic speaking) origin. In modern Israeli Hebrew, some loanwords, the pronunciation of whose source contains, and their derivations, are pronounced with, too, e.g. - (but: - ). Modern Hebrew has no standardized way to distinguish orthographically between and . The pronunciation is either determined by prior knowledge or must be derived through context. Some non standard spellings ...