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The Miscellany of the Spalding Club, Vol. 3 Spalding Club

The Miscellany of the Spalding Club, Vol. 3

Spalding Club

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331936510
Paperback
296 pages
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Excerpt from The Miscellany of the Spalding Club, Vol. 3Lord Grange, on the other hand affected to be a zealous Presbyterian, and a devoted adherent of the House of Hanover- and as such he figures prominently in the Diary or Analecta of theMoreExcerpt from The Miscellany of the Spalding Club, Vol. 3Lord Grange, on the other hand affected to be a zealous Presbyterian, and a devoted adherent of the House of Hanover- and as such he figures prominently in the Diary or Analecta of the industrious Wodrow, supplying that writer with shreds of the Court gossip which he loved so dearly, taking a conspicuous part in the proceedings of the General Assembly, or discussing abstruse questions of theology with the leading divines of the Kirk. The honesty of his professions, both in religion and politics, did not escape question: on one occasion we find him complaining that he was extremely abused by not a few at Edinburgh, and represented as a hypocrite and pretender to religion, as a Jacobite and in the same bottome with his brother, the Earl of Mar, and spoken of very much for his visiting his cousine, Mrs. Baderston- and on another he informs his correspondent that placards had been affixed on his door, at the Market Cross, and on the gates of the Assembly of the Kirk, demanding to know whither my Lord Grange be a Jesuit or not? whither he be a pensioner of the Pope? whither he can answer these queries? and whither, if he answer them, he ought to be believed? This is no place for discussing the justice of these imputations, and the confidential letters which are now printed must be left to speak for themselves as to the writers sincerity. They certainly contain no evidence of partiality to the cause of the exiled Royalists- but it may be permitted to doubt how far they are in all places consistent with the character of devotion which Lord Grange was so anxious to maintain. Honest Wodrow would probably have somewhat modified his opinion of his lordship, had he been permitted to read his sneers at the usual honesty of clergymen in the Church judicatorys, running headlong against the weak, and servilely crouching to the prevailing.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.